Holidays and long weekends often see more motorists on the roads, and state police plan on cracking down on impaired and reckless driving. While law enforcement maintains a constant vigilance throughout the year to put a stop to impaired driving, the holidays are the time of year you’ll see even more cops than usual.

Traffic Crashes in NY Statistics 

According to Tripnet.org, a total of 5,019 people were killed in traffic crashes in New York from 2015-2019. One somewhat startling statistic is that the fatality rate on New York’s non-interstate rural roads is more than two and a half times higher than on all other roads in the state, according to numbers.

New York State Police Crack Down 

New York State Police will participate in the “Drive High Get a DUI” national campaign and New Year’s impaired driving enforcement which runs Wednesday, December 14, 2022, through Sunday, January 1, 2023.

This means more checkpoints and more Troopers (both marked and unmarked) on the roadways. State police will also be on the lookout for distracted drivers, vehicle occupants who are not properly buckled up, and drivers violating the “Move Over Law”.

During last year’s crackdown, State Police arrested 522 people for DWI and issued 35,016 tickets, including 12,285 tickets for speeding, and 840 for distracted driving.

According to Moneygeek, 61% of drunk driving-related fatalities happen on the weekends (Friday through Sunday).

New York State Allegedly Had BAC Nearly 3X Legal Limit 

Police say a New York state man is facing charges after a Saturday morning crash that left two passengers injured.

CBS says a 19-year-old man from Coeymans crashed the Nissan 350Z at the Rolling Hills Mobile Home Park Saturday morning. According to the sheriff’s office, the driver was located near the crash scene and showed signs of intoxication. CBS says an investigation and testing determined that the man had been driving with a 0.22% blood alcohol content, which is nearly three times the state’s legal limit.

Police say the suspect is facing numerous charges, including felonies.

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